Disease Model of Addiction

In this micro-course, you will be introduced to a brief overview of the Disease Model of Addiction, and how the model underscores the importance of understanding behaviors as part of complex neurobiological interactions. Alcohol use, worry, overworking, perfectionism and isolation can be viewed as stress-induced behaviors which aim to avoid or alleviate discomfort.
The Disease Model of Addiction Course
ascent addiction recovery courses
Instructor: Self-Guided

Transformation and Results

Course description

 In this micro-course, you will be introduced to a brief overview of the Disease Model of Addiction, and how the model underscores the importance of understanding behaviors as part of complex neurobiological interactions. Alcohol use, worry, overworking, perfectionism and isolation can be viewed as stress-induced behaviors which aim to avoid or alleviate discomfort.

The disease model of addiction underscores the importance of understanding our behaviors as part of a complex set of neurobiological interactions. You will also learn how drug and alcohol use, worry, work-overload, perfectionism, and isolation can contribute to stress-induced behaviors, behaviors used to avoid or alleviate discomfort.  All are used to manage stress for the sake of survival and to get us through emotionally charged or threatening situations, even as the negative consequences begin to outweigh the benefits. 

Trying to stop a well-practiced, stress-induced behavior is often not as easy as one might think. Our brain is an extremely adaptive organ, continuously learning from our past behaviors and outcomes, storing and referencing them to use again in times of high stress. This course also covers the key neurobiological components of behaviors associated with addiction, and the impact they may have on our family members. You will learn about the medical consequences of stress-induced behaviors, relapse, and effects on your emotional state.

The Disease Model of Addiction course is among the many micro-courses within the Ascent Recovery Program. This program interprets through the lens of The Bio-Psycho-Social Model described by George Engel in 1977. The model attributes disease to: (1) biological factors, such as genetics and heritability, (2) psychological factors such as, mood, personality variables, and behavior, and (3) social factors, such as culture, family, and socioeconomics. 

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